Tag Archives: Laboratorio/Laboratory

LibreOffice Suite: All your research needs, for free

Finally, after much delay due to my dissertation work, I can resume my work on the role free-software can play in archaeology, in this second entry of Open source archaeology, a brief users guide (II). This is a topic I really enjoy writing about, because there are a lot of tools out there created and updated by devoted groups of supporters that just want to provide us with programs that are not restrained by the market rules and, whether you want to believe or not, they can be as good, if not better, than firmware. In the case of LibreOffice, at least for me, this is absolutely true.

LibreOffice is a project of The Document Foundation, a forked version from OpenOffice, and comprises programs for general office work, such as word processing, the creation and editing of spreadsheets, slide-shows, diagrams and drawings, mathematical formulae and, most important for archaeologists, databases. You can work in the native formats or with other software formats such as .doc, and there is no issue, at least on my experience, to shift from one to the other.

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Open source archaeology, a brief users guide (I)

A digital world like ours has many initiatives that perhaps we do not know, but that offer us open-source software for any task we can imagine. From whole operative systems (OS) to little programs for specific tasks, communities of coders work for free on alternatives to firmware software that in some cases can make us wonder why we still pay for programs when we can donate to this initiatives and enjoy great software. My work on GIS and GRASS was of course my first exposure to this technology but my best example would be LibreOffice: I have not used the Office Suit for more than a decade, and I have never encountered a problem on my research or on my publications.

archeos-5-menu
App menu of ArcheOS. Look at all the archeological software ready to be used!

Continue reading Open source archaeology, a brief users guide (I)